On Seeing THE CREATIVE BRAIN

CreativeBrainThere’s nothing like a good documentary, and I ran across a winner on Netflix. The Creative Brain is written and presented by Dr. David Eagleman, whose twenty-plus years as a neuroscientist inspired this hour-long program. Watch The Creative Brain>>

Eagleman, who is also one of the authors of The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World, interviews actors and musicians, nanotechnologists and architects, to “unlock the secrets of creativity.” His findings are both fascinating and motivating to those of us who define ourselves as makers, artists, and creatives—or who simply want to make an impact…

Human beings are special
Unlike other animals, we can “disengage our instincts” to see beyond the usual uses of things. For example, we can turn off our automatic response to eat when we see food. All of the possibilities that we are able to see in the world are “the foundation of our creativity.”

Originality is “bunk”
One of Eagleman’s guests describes jazz as a “mutt.” In other words, “being original is not about generating something out of nothing.” I think of all of the teachers, muses, and artistic ancestors who prove this point in my life—all of the books read and movies watched and music enjoyed. The list goes on. As a result, my contributions are the sum of a lot of input from various sources. Any originality is born from my unique life experience.

Creativity requires intentionality
Eagleman notes that, despite our great creative potential, humans remain wired to take “the path of least resistance”—to do what is easy. This path is the arch enemy of creativity. Eagleman closes his presentation with three tips for fighting the urge to live and work the same way day after day; I invite you to watch the show for these inspiring insights!

The program also concludes with a profile on a fine-arts elementary school, how it was saved from closing and now thrives given how creativity is “at the heart of every subject.” It just so happens that my own daughter will soon start Kindergarten in a similar setting, and The Creative Brain further affirms that we made the right choice. I trust that her education will help her become successful, innovative, and creative—to grow into an accomplished artist, musician, nanotechnologist, architect, or whatever she dreams to be!

Blog Posts 3.0: Reading, Learning, Trying, Seeing

I love blogging, but my approach to date has been a bit inconsistent. I began with writing little anecdotes related to the writing practice. These contributions were short-lived. I returned to posting after about five years of parenting and getting through the demands typical of infancy and toddlerhood. My inspiration for Take 2? A renewed sense of creativity upon reaching middle age—a more profound attention to and appreciation for art in all of its forms. 

I fell off the grid again last winter. I don’t really know why. I didn’t check out from engaging in creative pursuits and adventures. I didn’t stop reading and learning and trying and seeing. Aha! Perhaps the method to my creative madness is method indeed—that intrinsic method of how I ride the current of my creative flow. Reading. Learning. Trying. Seeing. This revelation gives me new motivation. So, today, I’m going to recommit to blogging and to posting regularly, probably weekly, on those very topics:

What I’m reading
I fell in love with the non-fiction work of Madeline L’Engle over the past several months. I discovered other authors, books, periodicals, instruction manuals, etc., that have enlightened my artistic knowledge and experience. My nightstand always features some kind of art-related read. 

What I’m learning
Earlier this summer, I invested in a three-month ninety-nine-cent Creative Bug membership. Through that resource and other online videos, I’ve watched people paint watercolor landscapes, stretch canvases, make collages—you name it! Such learning prepares me for the things I eventually take the time to try…

What I’m trying
Over the past year, I’ve dabbled in pour painting, poetry writing, graphic design, woodburning, etc. It’s fun to try new things and, as a result, I further discern my creative calling. I look forward to sharing my experiments here. 

What I’m seeing
I’m blessed to live in a city with such a rich offering of museums, exhibits, performances and all things creative. Such visits often spur what I read, learn and try next! 

I’m excited about picking up the ball of blogging again and approaching it with some more intentionality. Thank you for joining me on the journey!

Coursera Course: “Modern Art & Ideas”

logo_squareEvery so often I revisit one of my favorite online resources: Coursera.org. It’s a treasure trove of online courses covering all kinds of subject matter and taught by instructors from reputable educational institutions all over the world. What’s more, most courses are completely free!

In skimming the list of Coursera’s current “Arts and Humanities” courses, there was one in particular that caught my eye: “Modern Art & Ideas” presented by the Museum of Modern Art. The description reads:

This course is designed to help anyone interested in learning more about modern and contemporary art. Themes can provide an effective structure for engaging with art. In this course, you will explore four themes that educators at The Museum of Modern Art use frequently in their teaching: Places & Spaces, Art & Identity, Transforming Everyday Objects, and Art & Society. Through videos, slideshows, and a variety of resources, readings, and activities, you will explore the content and context of works of art in MoMA’s collection.

I have since completed Week 2 of five and absolutely love the method and materials. As mentioned in the course introduction, we’re studying art outside of the typical approach of movement and time period; instead, we’re examining pieces that have a certain quality or inspiration in common.

Join me? The course runs through April 30 and there’s plenty of time to catch up. The first “quiz” is due April 2, and I tend to spend less than an hour on each week’s  coursework. Furthermore, Coursera is great at starring the stuff you don’t want to miss and offering many more resources if you want to go deeper. Sign up now>>