On Learning PATCHWORK IMPROV

Despite my many attempts at sewing over the years, I’ve never been able to shed my frustration with puckers and crooked seams and all sorts of irregularities. Enter “Patchwork Improv,” the possible antidote to my feelings of defeat and disenchantment with precision patterns.

improvquiltThere are three “Patchwork Improv” classes offered through Creativebug and presented by Sherri Lynn Wood, an award-winning author and “improvisor.” I watched the series on working with shapes—the other two installments deal with angles and strips. Given what I experienced through the videos I’ve watched so far, I also can’t wait to pick up Wood’s book The Improv Handbook for Modern Quilters: A Guide to Creating, Quilting & Living Courageously (Abrams). Improv. Creating. Living courageously. Sure, I’m all ears!

The best part about patchwork improv? No measuring! It involves all free-hand cutting and trimming! No more aggravation with one piece not quite matching up with another, with the result looking kind of kitty wumpus—in fact, the more kitty wumpus, the better, with this art form. The process? I learned that you begin by cutting out a variety of “squarish” shapes from any old fabric —Wood loves tearing apart men’s shirts for her fodder—then determine your “filler fabric,” then rev up your sewing machine and go to town!

Not long ago, I purchased a funky geometric painting from one of my favorite local art centers. Now I can’t help but think of how I could make something similar with fabric using Wood’s improv methods. Stay tuned for an update!

 

On Learning FINGER KNITTING

Finger knitting. I remember learning how to finger knit from a childhood friend so many decades ago. We’d spend hours together during sleepovers making long lengths of narrow knitted tubing in various colors. Sometimes we’d attempt to make something useful from our thick, long ropes of yarn—little pillows or blankets for our dolls, for instance—but we were never quite satisfied with the end results. I eventually traded in finger knitting for embroidery and cross-stitch, which seemed much more sophisticated back in the day.

homepage-knitting-without-needlesIt was through Creativebug that I was recently reminded of the fun of finger knitting.  And thanks to the brilliance of maker Anne Weil, my eyes are now open to the craft’s possibilities. In one of her six Creativebug classes, Weil walks viewers through the steps of creating a pretty and practical woven rug from finger-knitted cords. The same project is featured in her book Knitting Without Needles, which is full of patterns for finger- and arm-knitters alike. I picked her book up from the library, along with Finger Knitting Fun by Vickie Howell, Arm & Finger Knitting by Laura Strutt and Finger Knitting by Mary Beth Temple. Sweaters, toys, hats, and blankets—the options seem endless as I page through these resources on finger knitting.

Of course, I have all I need to get started again: a good pair of hands and plenty of yarn. I think I’ll try Weil’s idea for a wreath first, then maybe I’ll finally have something presentable to show for my finger-knitting skills. It only took forty years.